Irvington Historic District Earns Distinction As Historic Place

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IRVINGTON, N.Y. -- The Village of Irvington announced that the Irvington Historic District, composed of the Main Street area, has earned the distinguished honor of being listed on both the National and New York State Registers of Historic Places.

The National Register of Historic Places is the official list of America’s historic places that are worthy of preservation. The New York State Register of Historic Places includes official lists of buildings, structures, districts and sites that are significant in the history, architecture and culture of New York.

“We are extremely proud that the Irvington Historic District has been recognized for the historic importance it represents to our community, the state and the nation,” said Irvington Mayor Brian Smith. 

“Irvington is known for its distinctive Main Street view of the Hudson River and its unique and eclectic homes and businesses. The new distinction will help us celebrate the special character and historical value of our Main Street area plus create awareness, community pride and open up assistance opportunities through grants."

A celebration of the Irvington Historic District designation will take place on Saturday, June 14,. throughout the village.

“Saturday, June 14, is a day for local residents and visitors to celebrate our history," said Village Trustee Kehoe.

"We can all experience a visit to a 1902 Reading Room designed by Louis Comfort Tiffany as well as a relaxing lunch at an outdoor café table, slurping down a healthy Fruitoppia. A trolley will loop through the village with local docents answering questions, kids will enjoy some simple, small-town entertainment and walkers can experience our challenging Main Street hill on their way to the Old Croton Aqueduct State Historic Park.”

For more information on the Irvington Historic District, as well as the plans for the celebration go to www.irvingtonny.gov or contact Village Administrator Larry Schopfer at lschopfer@irvingtonny.gov or 914- 591-4358.

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