Historic Hudson Valley's Sheep-To-Shawl Delights Sleepy Hollow

  • Comments (1)
Cortlandt Town Historian Laura Lee Keting helps dye wool at Sheep-to-Shawl in Sleepy Hollow.
Cortlandt Town Historian Laura Lee Keting helps dye wool at Sheep-to-Shawl in Sleepy Hollow. Photo Credit: Sam Barron
Sheep were the main attraction at Sheep-to-Shawl in Sleepy Hollow.
Sheep were the main attraction at Sheep-to-Shawl in Sleepy Hollow. Photo Credit: Sam Barron
Linda Sex spins wool at Sheep-to-Shawl in Sleepy Hollow.
Linda Sex spins wool at Sheep-to-Shawl in Sleepy Hollow. Photo Credit: Sam Barron
Tina Trimble was processing flax at Sheep-to-Shawl in Sleepy Hollow.
Tina Trimble was processing flax at Sheep-to-Shawl in Sleepy Hollow. Photo Credit: Sam Barron
Geese were one of the spectators at Sheep-to-Shawl in Sleepy Hollow.
Geese were one of the spectators at Sheep-to-Shawl in Sleepy Hollow. Photo Credit: Sam Barron
Trying to get a duck out of the bushes was a difficult task at Sheep-to-Shawl in Sleepy Hollow.
Trying to get a duck out of the bushes was a difficult task at Sheep-to-Shawl in Sleepy Hollow. Photo Credit: Sam Barron
Martha V. North shows off her rugs at Sheep-to-Shawl in Sleepy Hollow.
Martha V. North shows off her rugs at Sheep-to-Shawl in Sleepy Hollow. Photo Credit: Sam Barron

SLEEPY HOLLOW, N.Y. -- The clock was turned back in Sleepy Hollow this weekend.

Historic Hudson Valley hosted its annual Sheep-to- Shawl event in Philipsburg Manor in Sleepy Hollow. 

The event allows visitors to explore the process of turning wool into cloth using 18th-century techniques. Activities included dyeing wool and weaving and Scottish border collies displaying their skills at sheep and duck-herding.

"We've been kicking off our spring season for many years with Sheep-to-Shawl," Rob Schweitzer, director of marketing for Historic Hudson Valley, said. "It's a perennial favorite for our visitors.

Schweitzer said Historic Hudson Valley considers Sheep-to-Shawl the symbolic opening of their season.

"After this brutal winter, we are thrilled to get back to welcoming visitors," Schweitzer said. "I am excited about the new elements this year that focus on the important role of textiles in the colonial era."

Gail Hintz was showing off how to thread and knit the wool into clothes.

"I have been involved with Historic Hudson Valley and Sheep-to-Shawl for 20 years," Hintz, who started out as a milkmaid, said.

Hintz has gone from milking cows to giving tours and working with school groups.

Tina Trimble was processing flax to help make linen clothes . Trimble, an education associate at Historic Hudson Valley also works at Sunnyside and Van Cortlandt Manor.

Trimble was taking the flax, drying it and then breaking it up with a tool called appropriately, the breaker.

Martha V. North was on hand to show off her rugs and embroidery. North uses photographs and turns them into rugs, spending six months on a project. She was in the Sheep-to-Shawl show when she was in fourth grade.

"I do embroidery on my commute to the city," North said. "I work on the rugs for up to 90 minutes a day."

This was North's  first time selling rugs at the festival and she said she was having a great time.

"It's nice to show traditional art is still being done," North said.

Linda Sax was spinning wool that had just been combed. Sax, who had been coming to the event since 1998, was glad the weather cooperated for the annual event.

  • 1
    Comments

Comments (1)

time well spent.